Washington D.C. men who allegedly posed as federal agents had stockpile of weapons, new filing shows

0
59

Fox News Flash headlines for April 8

Fox News Flash headlines are here. See what’s clicked on Foxnews.com.

A new federal court filing has revealed two Washington, D.C. men suspected of impersonating federal agents, including stockpiling weapons, tactical gear and hard drives.

Arian Taherzadeh, 40, and Haider Ali, 35, were arrested Wednesday in a luxury apartment in the Navy Yard District in Washington, D.C., when federal agencies raided several units. The men were charged in U.S. District Court on Thursday with impersonating federal officials.

Federal law enforcement officers seized a 17-round Glock 9mm pistol, a Sig Sauer P229 with five full magazines, and multiple “firearm parts” that prosecutors said were often associated with “long guns and guns.” Assault Rifle” for use with other weapons.

  • Picture 1 of 7

    Federal prosecutors filed a detention motion Friday morning, revealing some of what the FBI and other agencies found when executing a search warrant on Wednesday, including a stockpile of weapons allegedly owned by Taherzadeh and Ali. (Ministry of Justice)

  • Picture 2 of 7

    Federal prosecutors filed a detention motion Friday morning, revealing some of what the FBI and other agencies found when executing a search warrant on Wednesday, including a stockpile of weapons allegedly owned by Taherzadeh and Ali. (Ministry of Justice)

  • Image 3 of 7

    Federal prosecutors filed a detention motion Friday morning, revealing some of what the FBI and other agencies found when they executed a search warrant on Wednesday, including a stockpile of weapons allegedly owned by Taherzadeh and Haider. (Ministry of Justice)

  • Picture 4 of 7

    Federal prosecutors filed a detention motion Friday morning, revealing some of what the FBI and other agencies found when they executed a search warrant on Wednesday, including a stockpile of weapons allegedly owned by Taherzadeh and Haider. (Ministry of Justice)

  • Picture 5 of 7

    Federal prosecutors filed a detention motion Friday morning, revealing some of what the FBI and other agencies found when they executed a search warrant on Wednesday, including a stockpile of weapons allegedly owned by Taherzadeh and Haider. (Ministry of Justice)

  • Image 6 / 7

    Federal prosecutors filed a detention motion Friday morning, revealing some of what the FBI and other agencies found when they executed a search warrant on Wednesday, including a stockpile of weapons allegedly owned by Taherzadeh and Haider. (Ministry of Justice)

  • Picture 7 of 7

    Federal prosecutors filed a detention motion Friday morning, revealing some of what the FBI and other agencies found when they executed a search warrant on Wednesday, including a stockpile of weapons allegedly owned by Taherzadeh and Haider. (Ministry of Justice)

Officers executing the search warrant found multiple gun safes and air guns.

In addition, law enforcement officers recovered a “substantial amount of electronic equipment,” including a “substantial” surveillance device, 30 hard drives, a hard drive duplication device, a server containing “six modules,” and a card that created and programmed Personal Authentication and Blank card with chip.

  • Pics 1 of 4

    Immigration documents for “some people” were also found, as well as “a box of documents with biographies”. (Ministry of Justice)

  • pics 2 of 4

    In addition, law enforcement officers recovered a “substantial amount of electronic equipment,” including a “substantial” surveillance device, 30 hard drives, a hard drive duplication device, a server containing “six modules,” and a card that created and programmed Personal Authentication and Blank card with chip. (Ministry of Justice)

  • Image 3 of 4

    In addition, law enforcement officers recovered a “substantial amount of electronic equipment,” including a “substantial” surveillance device, 30 hard drives, a hard drive duplication device, a server containing “six modules,” and a card that created and programmed Personal Authentication and Blank card with chip. (Ministry of Justice)

  • Picture 4 of 4

    Immigration documents for “some people” were also found, as well as “a box of documents with biographies”. (Ministry of Justice)

A passport belonging to Ali was also recovered and showed two visas from Iran. Prosecutors said the first visa allowed travel to Iran between July 31, 2019 and October 28, 2019, and the second visa allowed travel to Iran between October 28, 2019, and January 25, 2020.

The passport also contains a visa from Pakistan.

  • pics 1 of 3

    A passport belonging to Ali was also recovered and showed two visas from Iran. Prosecutors said the first visa allowed travel to Iran between July 31, 2019 and October 28, 2019, and the second visa allowed travel to Iran between October 28, 2019, and January 25, 2020. (Ministry of Justice)

  • Image 2 of 3

    A passport belonging to Ali was also recovered and showed two visas from Iran. Prosecutors said the first visa allowed travel to Iran between July 31, 2019 and October 28, 2019, and the second visa allowed travel to Iran between October 28, 2019, and January 25, 2020. (Ministry of Justice)

  • Image 3 of 3

    A passport belonging to Ali was also recovered and showed two visas from Iran. Prosecutors said the first visa allowed travel to Iran between July 31, 2019 and October 28, 2019, and the second visa allowed travel to Iran between October 28, 2019, and January 25, 2020. (Ministry of Justice)

Tactical gear and other law enforcement equipment were found, including clothing with police logos, police stop signs, fingerprint kits, and equipment for knocking on doors, such as sledgehammers and lockpicking kits.

Immigration documents for “some people” were also found, as well as “a box of documents with personal details”.

One document found was the defendant’s Chevrolet Impala invoice; the listed customer information read “US Secret Service” and displayed a pseudonym.

One document found was an invoice for a Chevrolet Impala belonging to the defendants, in which the customer’s information indicated “U.S. Secret Service” using a false name.
(Ministry of Justice)

Tahzadeh was also allegedly seen in a video obtained by law enforcement that “fired pistols and assault rifles” at a shooting range believed to be located in Northern Virginia. In one of the videos, prosecutors allege he was wearing a long-sleeved shirt with “US Secret Service” emblazoned on it. According to prosecutors, Tahzad was banned from possessing the weapons.

In a voluntary interview after Taherzadeh’s arrest, he admitted to mistakenly identifying himself as a member of the Department of Homeland Security and a former U.S. Army Ranger. He also said he gave two Secret Service agents a free apartment for a year, in addition to multiple other gifts to Secret Service members.

Tahzid also admitted to deleting social media content related to law enforcement after becoming aware of a federal investigation into the two men’s activities, according to prosecutors.

Prosecutors demanded that the two men be detained pending trial, saying Ali was a flight risk and that Tahzid may have attempted to obstruct justice.

The pair will hold a detention hearing on Friday.

The conspirators’ plot began to unravel when a U.S. Postal Inspector arrived at their apartment complex to investigate an alleged attack involving a U.S. Postal Service operator, according to prosecutors.

The men identified themselves as investigators with the U.S. Special Police Investigations Unit, which Ali said was part of the Department of Homeland Security, and that Tahzad was a DHS investigative agent.

The U.S. Postal Inspector then provided the information to the DHS Office of the Inspector General and then to the FBI, according to a court document.

To prove he was a DHS employee, Tahzad took a photo of himself on a DHS “vest”. Secret Service agents investigating the two suspects also allegedly saw multiple photos of Taherzadeh in police tactical gear, according to prosecutors.

Tahzad also allegedly sent Secret Service investigators a photo that he said allegedly came from a training session but was actually pulled from a DHS social media post.

Federal prosecutors said Tahzad identified himself as a DHS Bureau of Investigation agent, a Secret Service agent currently assigned to the First Lady’s Protection Unit, and Ali identified himself as a Homeland Security Investigations Analyst.

Fox News confirmed that two of the four Secret Service agents involved in the investigation work in the uniforms department, one of whom was on duty near Vice President Harris’ residence but did not have details of her person.

Another now-suspended Secret Service agent has been assigned to First Lady Jill Biden’s presidential protection division, and sources told Fox News that the agent may at times fill in with close ties to President Biden but not on the presidential routine. Details of agents within security perimeter.

Residents of the luxury Navy Yard apartment complex told inspectors that the pair set up video surveillance throughout the building and said they believed they had access to personal information, even saying the men claimed they had access to residents’ cell phones.

Federal law enforcement agencies enter an apartment building in Washington, D.C.
(Fox News/Kelly Laco)

A witness who was a member of the Secret Service said Tahzad had access to “all floors of the apartment,” including some restricted areas. Witnesses said Taherzadeh was able to gain this access by talking to the management of the apartment complex and identifying himself as a federal agent.

Taherzadeh allegedly controls a limited liability company called “United Special Police LLC,” which is described as a private law enforcement, investigative, and protective services agency based in Washington, D.C.

David Spunt of Fox News contributed to this report

source: Read the full article

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here